Warm temperatures have finally arrived and it’s time to move my indoor plants to the great outdoors. I started these peppers in December using 5 gallon space buckets, which they quickly outgrew. Once they were too big for the buckets, I moved each pepper into its own closet and moved one Vero 18 out of each space bucket into these 2 closets.  I initially had a Moruga scorpion and a Chocolate Brainstrain under each light, but due to an incident involving my beloved hound, one of the Chocolate Brainstrain plants was broken in half, so the only real comparison is between the Morugas. Here are the peppers on their last day under the lights:

 

5000K Scorpion on the left, 3000K Scorpion on the right.

5000K Scorpion

3000K Scorpion

3000K Scorpion pods

5000K pods.

 

3000K Chocolate Brainstrain

The 5000K Chocolate Brainstrain that was broken in half. It’s recovered pretty well but is much smaller.

3000K Brainstrain pods. They’re ugly – looking forward to them turning brown.

The peppers’ new home in the yard.

A handful of peppers that ripened beneath the lights indoors.

Observations

Both plants did really well, though there were a few differences:

  • The 5000K plant ended up being bigger. It has a thicker stem and the plant is a little taller and wider. The 3000K scorpion grew faster over the first couple of months, but the 5000K caught up and passed it.
  • The 5000K plant produced peppers considerably faster. The first fruit on the 5000K appeared 1-2 weeks before one showed up on the 3000K.
  • The 3000K plant is a little bushier. The leaves are smaller but they’re denser.
  • The pods are about the same size on both plants. No difference there.
  • There are more flowers on the 3000K Scorpion. If I can pollinate a good chunk of them, I think the 3000K will have more pods growing on it.

Overall, I’m really pleased with how well these plants did indoors. I’m eager to see how well they transition outside – I may move them from their 5 gallon fabric pots into bigger containers to see if they will grow any bigger. That’ll conclude this little experiment… now to think of what to try next!